I’m a Grit Salesman – Read the First Issue for Free!

2018-07-14T17:20:34+00:00By |

Grit’s Happy Ambassadors: Its 30,000 Boy Salesmen
February 1962

“Here’s your copy of Grit, Mrs. Jones.”

Every week similar welcomed words are echoed hundreds of thousands of times from coast to coast by an army of eager, bright-faced boys. They are the happy ambassadors for America’s Greatest Family Newspaper.

Actually, Grit’s distribution through the Little Merchant system gives each boy a business of his own. In conducting it for his own profit and the prizes he wins, he also performs an invaluable service, one the prime reasons for Grit’s steadily increasing circulation through the years.

About 90 percent of Grit’s circulation is obtained through single copy sales by these young business men who sell the paper for 15 cents, keeping 5 cents profit and sending 10 cents to Grit to pay for the paper.

The remaining 10 percent of the circulation is in the form of subscriptions – payable in advance – the papers being delivered each week by mail.

Huge Army of Boys
More than 30,000 boys sell Grit each week in a few hours of their spare time in more than 16,000 small towns.

Recruiting, helping, training, and encouraging this large sales force and handling their accounts are the major efforts of Grit’s Circulation Department under Circulation Director Paul E. Fink.

By selling Grit these boys not only have the opportunity to make money and win prizes, but also to obtain valuable business training which will be helpful to them through life. They learn to be courteous and cheerful in approaching customers, dependable and punctual in delivery of their weekly copies of Grit, and careful and thrifty in handling money.

Boy Sales Come First
The company does not push mail subscriptions, as other publications do, because it does not want to hurt the sale of any of the thousands of salesboys.

As a member of the Audit Bureau of Circulation, Grit’s circulation statements are certified.

A.B.C. statements for Grit also show that no gimmicks or premiums, offers of deep-cut prices, circulation carried in arrears, or paid-during-service plans are necessary for Grit to maintain its circulation. People buy Grit because they enjoy reading it. In the publishing field that is what is know as “clean” circulation – the kind most valuable to advertisers.

Readers Share Higher Costs
Rising production costs and postal rate increases over the last 15 years have not been passed on to the advertiser alone. The Grit reader has borne his full share. The price of Grit was increased from 5 cents to 7 cents in 1944; from 7 to 10 cents in 1949 and from 10 to 15 cents in 1959.

Although each price increase temporarily slowed down the circulation growth, two factors have prevailed – the real satisfaction every issue of Grit brings to all members of the family, and the smiling, ambitious, business-like boy who brings Grit to their home promptly every week.

 

Enjoying Local History? Want More?
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IT’S FREE! My Gift to You!

GritFIrstIssueDownload and immediately begin reading the inaugural issue of Grit, first printed December 16, 1882. Here’s a sample of the news of the day:

Grit Bits: December 16, 1882
Streets in Poor Shape

Williamsport streets are in good condition, thanks to Providence, which gives us weather which freezes and thereby solidifies things; but when spring comes and the weather gets warm, then look out for a disappearance of all things mundane or otherwise that is so unfortunate as to get into the streets.

CLICK HERE >>> and you can download and read the first issue of this historic newspaper, reliving the events of YesterYear.

Use this password to unlock and read your issue of Sunday Grit: 589SDPR17702

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About the Author:

Robin Van Auken, CEO of Hands on Heritage, is a writer and researcher, with 35+ years experience interviewing people and telling stories. Her educational background combines advanced degrees in Communications and Anthropology, with a focus on Public and Historical (Military/Industrial Sites) Archaeology. In addition to her work as a journalist, she is the author and co-author of a dozen books on regional history. An adjunct college instructor, she has directed multi-year historical and archaeological projects, working with hundreds of volunteers and temporary staff, and educating thousands of visitors.